The Trail of G’desh

It is said long ago there was a land of green which expanded as far as the eye could see. There was a city built by God. Man and fire lived in harmony and man did not want.

Madur, the body of the flame, lusted after man. He desired their women. He fought their men. He gave favor and pain as he saw fit.

When God returned and saw what had been done, He took Madur and said, “Man is a fool to forget me. You are a curse to lead them astray. Know this, special punishment is reserved for those who lead my flock astray.” The Lord struck Madur for forty days, and sparks flew from the fire of Madur. Each flame took life and fled the Green City.

On the last day, the fire of Madur was no bigger than a man. God said, “Madur is dead, reforged into G’desh. I warn you, little fire, do not give into your lust for man’s rights, but burn only for purity. Now take man and delven south and never return to the Green City.”

Man, delven, and flame were exiled. They went south to the desert.

G’desh remained aloof for weeks after leaving. He was wise, giving rare council and annointed worthy prophets. He was faithful to teaching God’s will in the evening. He loved man as a grandfather loves his grandchildren.

There was a woman in the camp, Jazeb. She had a good heart and cared for those in need. Her kindness was only matched by her beauty. However, her heart was keen on what it could not have: G’desh. She approached him often. After he burned the Dry River, she was the only to speak to him. The fire spirit conjured three wells to feed Lake G’desh, which brought animals and foliage. Exhausted, his temperament was undesirable. Jazeb soothed him in his anger.

Jazeb gained a reputation. The men, scorned by her when they proposed, said she only enjoyed fire, and no man could stand against G’desh. As the reputation spread, she was outcast more from men. She took company with willing delven, but their traditions were uncomfortable and foreign to her. She spent increasing amounts of time with G’desh.

Finally G’desh asked, “Jazeb, you are beautiful, intelligent, and faithful. Why don’t you marry? All the men fawn for you, but you spend too much time with me. It makes them unrightfully jealous.”

Jazeb did not speak. She dropped her robes and was naked before G’desh. His innocence turned to ash and he recalled God’s warning and understood the lust of fire. However, it did not stop his fire from blazing.G’desh took Jazeb that night and knew her. In that act, she was made fat with child.

The heart of Madur awakened in G’desh’s chest. He became lecherous and angry. He fought with men and bedded their women. He broke maidens so they could not wed. The seed of fire was spread liberally around the camp, like the blood of the men who tried to oppose him. Jazeb, knowing that she woke up this fire in G’desh, wept day and night, mourning the loss of the spirit she loved.

G’desh and those following reached the southern tip of Lake G’desh before Jazeb gave birth. Jazeb, ashamed, made camp far from her people. Others who were taken by G’desh joined her in the camp. They were called the Mothers of Ash, as G’desh took what he could, burned away all that was good, and left them to blow away in the wind.

There was no desire in G’desh for the delven, and they were saved his deprivations, though they watched the spirit with a weary eye. He continued to subject men and women to his will, and Ash Mothers continued to give birth to his spawn.

The people settled on the southern tip of Lake G’desh, and there they build a small city where one day the massive Bronze City would sit. Before then, however, the village would be blown away and rebuilt repeatedly.

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